Taiwan, Travel Tips

Taipei Part 2 Series: Getting a tourist visa as a couple

 

Single entry tourist visas for the Hubby and myself


This year, my husband and I vowed to discover new things together. Fortunately, we are blessed to have the opportunity to travel together at the end of the month to Taiwan for a short vacation  and as an early celebration for our wedding anniversary. 
The truth is – I already visited Taiwan, particularly Taipei two years ago with my sister. It was one of the best places I visited: friendly locals, affordable and yummy food anywhere you go, interesting sights and culture, plus the opportunity to fan girl to Meteor Garden and Jay Chou (which my sister and I both did). 

So, when the hubby and I discussed possible trip destinations other than Osaka (we are still saving for it), we both agreed that Taipei is a nice place to discover (for him). We were lucky to land round trip tickets MNL-TPE-MNL for only PHP5,500 per person. The ticket was booked in August, three months before the planned trip. We paid for the tickets via SM Bayad Center (wait for a separate post on this), our flights were immediately confirmed upon payment – thus, the only thing left to do is get the tourist visa. 

In my case, I am confident that getting a tourist visa will be a breeze: I already had a prior tourist visa to Taiwan plus Japan and S.Korea (twice). What I was more worried about is the hubby who works freelance. While he already had prior visits to Singapore and HongKong, the hubby’s passport is new (hence no travel stamps) and his freelance work status means he has no ITR and Certificate of Employment — two things, in my opinion, that always seal the deal for any visa application. 

So how do you take your chances and apply for a visa when your traveling companion doesn’t have these very important requirements? 

Note: I have previously blogged about getting a visa to Taiwan, see here – this is the UPDATED version. 

  1. First thing I did is do my research and look up online if there are tips and to do’s for a situation like mine. There is none. That is the reason why I am writing this post – it is my means to give back for the good fortune of being issued a visa. 
  2. Prepare all documents needed – I always believed that in any battle, being prepared means increasing any chances of winning. Here are the documents needed in applying for a visa: 
  • Visa Application Form – to be filled in online. Head to https://visawebapp.boca.gov.tw/ Note that you will need to fill it up online and print on A4 size paper. The Taiwan visa will only accept computer-filled forms, avoid leaving any space blank (you can put N/A). 
  • Two passport sized photos 1.5″ X 2″ – should be taken within the last 3 months 
  • Valid passport (with more than 6 months validity) 
  • NSO-issued birth certificate 
  • Marriage contract issued by NSO (if applicable) 
  • Financial documents like bank certificate and ITR 
  • If you are employed, Certificate of Emplyment and Approved Leave form 
  • Supporting documents like airline tickets and hotel booking forms 

Have your documents photocopied. 

    3. Once you have the documents,  you are ready to submit it to the Taiwan Economic and Culture Office (TECO) located at the 41st floor of the RCBC Plaza in Makati. 

    Note: Due to the One-China Policy, Taiwan does not have an embassy in the Philippinss. TECO services all consular and diplomatic efforts in the Philippines 

      

    TECO accepts visa applications from Monday Friday’s from 9AM to 11AM only. Meanwhile, releasing of visa is from 2PM to 4PM. 

    Now that you’re at RCBC, here are some tips to make your visa application hassle free: 

      
    Be there early – this endeavor involved a lot of lining up: you will be asked to line up first in order to register your name for the giving out of numbers. This line usually starts inside the RCBC but only ten people can line up inside at any given time, so the rest will be asked to wait outside until the first ten has registered (see photo above) 

    Note that you will be lining up with applicants for work visas so be there early. 8AM is a good time. After you have registered your name, you will be asked to go back outside and proceed to the area near the entrance of the RCBC museum to wait for the distribution of numbers. 

    Have a valid ID with you – note that they are very strict when it comes to IDs – valid IDs are SSS, unified ID, Drivers License. Company IDs are not official government ID but you can use them provided you will leave a PHP1,000 deposit which will be returned to you after you have filed your application. 

    A TECO staff will approach the waiting area and will start calling name. Once your name is called, show them your ID, claim the queu stub and go back inside the RCBC Plaza to surrender your ID at the registration area where you will be finally issued building IDs and asked to go up the 41st floor. 

    Curve the urge to bring a companion with you if they are not applying for a visa also. They will not be allowed to go up TECO anyway. 

     

    The waiting game


    Once at the 41st floor, wait for your number to be called, proceed to the assigned window and submit your document. 

     Once the documents are perceived to be in order and received by the staff, you will be asked to wait for your name to be called by the cashier. 
    Pay the visa application fee – single entry tourist visa is PHP2400 per pax. A receipt will be issued to you upon payment – the receipt contains the date of release of your passports. Please note that you may or may not be issued a visa, depending on the evaluation of the consul. TECO reserves the right to withhold reason for denial. 

    Do you have valid visas to the US, Japan, UK, Australia or Shengen? If yes, you don’t need to apply for a visa. You just need to fill out a special form which you can get from this page.

    In the end , the hubby and I were issued single entry tourist visas. I guess what did the trick was that the hubby and I were able to provide substantial financial capacity through our bank certificates, we submitted a certificate for our joint account and another one for my savings account. I was also able to prove strong ties to the Philippines through my CoE. Lastly and for good measure, I took the risk of writing TECO a letter expressing that while my husband has no ITR and COE, we are confident that we can fund our trip and assured them of our intention to return. 


    Note: this is based on my experience applying for a tourist visa for Taiwan. Outcome of individual visa applications may vary, depending on the evaluation of the consul. 

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      South Korea, Travel News

      South Korean Embassy announces new Tourist Visa requirements

      The South Korean Embassy announced recently its new documentary requirements for those who would like to get Tourist Visas to South Korea.

      I have written about the Requirements for Tourist Visa before during my first visit last 2012. But last February 17, the embassy announced new requirements which will take effect starting 01 March 2015. This means that all applications which will be received by the embassy from March 01, moving forward should have the following requirements.

      Below is the screen shot I took of the announcement posted at the South Korean embassy website.

      new visa requirements_SK_2015

      It’s unfortunate that the embassy has become more strict and more thorough when it comes to their requirements. In a hindsight, they are actually asking for the same requirements like before, the difference is that they are more thorough and specific with the information that should be included in the posting.

      For the Bank Certificate requirements, these information can be requested from the bank itself once you asked for the certificate. In my opinion, what is a bit tricky is for those whose bank account does not usually show a regular flow of savings or input of money. For those who maintain a regular savings account and regularly deposit in their account, any of the changes indicated by the embassy is not a big deal. My impression is that the embassy wants to make sure that there is a regular input of money or savings in the bank account, and not a one-time, big-time kind of thing.

      For those who have regular savings account, you must now collate the account statements usually sent by our banks once a month. For BPI account holders, you can actually print this on your own if you have a BPI Express Online account. Again, my impression is that the embassy wants to see the regular input-output of your finances.

      Lastly, a bit of a reminder for the submission of ITR. Sometimes, we have to verify with our respective HRs if the TIN numbers reflected in our ITRs are correct. For example, my good friend (who was with me during my last Korea trip) discovered that there is a discrepancy in her TIN number when she submitted her ITR certificate during her visa application. While it is not of her own doing, she had to personally verify with our HR (and yes, only to confirm that there was a problem in the inputting of her TIN) and sort the problem herself at the BIR office. Of course, in the end she was given a visa — but the bottom line is that this proves that the embassy thoroughly checks every document we submit.

      On a related note, another announcement included in the SK Embassy’s Visa Announcement page explicitly indicates that a passport should be at least six months valid at the time of the Visa application. So, if you have plans applying for a tourist visa for South Korea and your passport has already barely a year left in its validity, might I recommend that you also take the opportunity to have it renewed prior to going to the embassy? This will save you time and save you from a series of “what if’s…”

      Good luck on your Visa Application and just remember that after all the hassle of making sure your documents are in order — it’ll be all worth it as soon as you land in South Korea and you see just how beautiful and wonderful your experience will be.

      SOURCE:
      The Embassy of the Republic of South Korea – Manila

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      Japan, Travel Tips

      A Quick Guide to getting your Japan Tourist Visa

      For as long as I can remember, I’ve always wanted to go to Japan. My dream started when I was still a snot-nosed eight year old kid with a bad case of crush with Alexis (aka Shaider). In my mind, Japan was the land of flying robots, of magnificent hide outs under volcanoes, of cute felines and their friends. As years passed, I fell more and more in love with the culture of Japan.

      When I started working–I made a point to save up in order to travel. I started with visa-free countries, until I got to the nerve to apply for a South Korean and Taiwanese tourist visa. While a part of me wanted to try my luck to get a visa for Japan, a bigger part of me was holding me back–afraid that I might not qualify for a tourist visa. I knew the disappointment will kill me.

      However, this year I resolved to throw caution to the wind and just do it.

      chibi

      I began to religiously follow fare guides and forum exchanges for tips and tricks in scoring cheap airline tickets and of course, getting a tourist visa. I made sure to have money available and saved up any extra money six months before the trip. I read and re-read blogs and attended travel fairs. While I cannot control the outcome of my visa application, being ready and preparing for the application has made me more sane and more confident on my chances to get the visa. All the hassles and heartbreaks and stressful moments preparing for the trip has made me more determined than ever.

      To give back to the many blogs and forums that helped guide me during my visa application process, I am sharing some tips based on my experience in getting that coveted Japan tourist visa.

      REQUIRED DOCUMENTS
      First, the list of document requirements — Submitting a completed requirement is winning more than half the battle and in my opinion, will probably dictate the processing of your application. Here are the documents that you will need to prepare:

      1. Visa Application Form – downloadable here and here. Note that applying a visa to Japan is only possible through the following accredited travel agencies: Friendship Tours (the one I used. Highly recommended!), Universal Holidays, Discovery Tour, Rajah Travel, Reli Tours, Attic Tours and Pan Pacific Travel (for applications without Japanese guarantor).

      Travel agency contact details here

      Some tips:
      * It’s up to you to choose the embassy of your preference. Note that, technically there is no cost in getting a single entry tourist visa to Japan, but since you have to do the application through an embassy, it is only understandable that the agency will collect a handling fee. Handling fee varies depending on the agency — when my sister applied for her first visa in 2013 via Reli Tours, she paid close to PHP2,500. We only paid Friendship Tours PHP1,200 for our most recent visa application and my sister was even issued a multiple entry visa!
      * Fill up the Visa application form electronically – It’s neater and more presentable. Avoid erasures and do not leave blank spaces. Put N/A when the question does not apply to you. Remember: First impression counts!
      * Have your photo taken on a professional photo studio. Just tell them that you need visa application photos — more established photo studios have a format already for visa requirements of different countries. For Japan, measurement is 4.5cm x 4.5cm with white background. You will be asked to remove your jewelry. If you are wearing a tank top or collarless blouse, you will need to borrow from the studio’s collection of blazers. If you have a thing against wearing other people’s clothes, I suggest you wear a professional looking top when you have your photo taken.

      2. Passport – should be valid for more than six months. I know people who didn’t realized that their passport validity is up until the very last minute, so I suggest you go OC (even for a bit) and check your passport validity before even booking that flight.

      3. National Statistics Office (NSO)-issued Birth Certificate and Marriage Contract (if you are married) – The certificates have to be issued the year of your visa application. Avoid the hassle–do not use your old NSO birth certificates, I assure you the agency will double check if your documents are recent. If you can spare a few thousand bucks to go to Japan, I assure you — you can spare a few hundred to get new documents.

      If you already have an existing visa to Japan (used or not), you no longer need to submit this. You may skip this part.

      4. Tour Itinerary, also called “Schedule of Stay” – there is a recommended format of this downloadable on the travel agency’s website. Bottom line, the Tour Itinerary will be used by the agency to gauge if the money you have is enough based on the activities you plan to do. The schedule of stay contains your whereabouts on the dates you are in Japan, your accommodation options, your contact numbers — in short, it’s your schedule while you are in Japan.

      Take note: what you put here is not set in stone. This is just a guide and a reference.

      For example, for our five day stay in Tokyo, I indicated the places I will visit per day (but not too specific — just general places no need to indicate specific sites or areas of interests if you are not too familiar). But since I am also a bit OC, I also indicated the possible time where I will return to the hostel.

      Just my two cents: if you don’t have too much money in the bank, then do not too much pricey places or attractions. For example, you can’t claim that you will be going to Disneyland, Disney Sea, Hello Kitty Puro Land, a day tour in Mt. Fuji then stay in a posh Shibuya hotel with less than PHP50,000 in your travel budget.

      5. Proof of Financial Capability – this is your Bank Certificate, indicating your current bank balance. If you are a BPI bank account holder (like I do), you can get your Bank Certificate in less than an hour. A PHP100-processing fee applies.

      Some of you might ask what constitutes an acceptable amount of savings account in the bank in order to qualify for a visa. Honestly, I do not know. I only had PHP7X,XXX in my bank account and yet, I was issued a visa.

      6. Proof of strong economic ties to the Philippines – this is to prove that you have a reason to go back to the Philippines. These are usually your Employment Certificate and your most recent Income Tax Returns. For the love of God, please do not be tempted to submit a fake employment certificate. It will be very embarrassing for you if you are caught.

      Since I am also traveling with one of my good friends from high school (we were friends since we were 13!) who works independently and does not have an ITR, I was actually a bit nervous if she will be issued a visa. What I know is that she submitted a letter explaining why she doesn’t have an ITR and an employment certificate. I will have to verify with her what she said in the letter. I guess, it also helped that my friend has tons of immigration stamps on her passport already since she is a keen traveler.

      If you are in doubt regarding this requirement, do not hesitate to call your travel agency.

      Since I am also shamelessly OC, I also attached the following in my application letter:
      * A signed leave form annotated by my company’s HR department
      * Return airline tickets (MNL-NRT-MNL via Cebu Pacific booked three months before the trip)
      * Confirmed hotel reservations from K’s House Tokyo Oasis (rated number 1 on TripAdvisor’s Guesthouses in Taito)

      HOW TO APPLY
      1. Choose a travel agency and complete your documents even before you drop by the agency. By completing your documents, you have already won half the battle (cos the other half, I believe, is luck). Processing of application usually takes 5 to 7 days (mine took four days) so I will recommend that you apply for your visa a month before your trip.

      2. Go to the agency and submit your documents. Pay for the processing fee.

      3. Leave and start praying to the Travel Gods for a successful visa application.

      Honestly, my travel time from my office in Bonifacio Global City to the Friendship Tours office in Dusit Thani Hotel in Ayala, Makati took longer than the time I have spent inside the agency office. Friendship Tours have very efficient and friendly front liners — who will check your documents one by one before getting your payment and issuing you a receipt. You will present this receipt when you claim your passport after five days.

      finally.

      finally.

      FINAL WORD
      If you are from Manila, I hope you will find this guide helpful as you make your dreams come true–the same way that I relied on the tips and tricks shared by others online. While there’s talk that there’s a big possibility that Japan will announce visa-free entry to tourists come June, I will definitely believe it once it’s officially posted on the Japan Embassy Manila website. This is a welcome development and something long-awaited by travelers and Japanophiles alike. In fact, I have already dreaming about my next trip should this happen — visit Osaka and Kyoto with the husband this December, perhaps?

      However, I have to admit that I still have reservations should this happen. My only prayer is that, if granted, may this privilege be not abused by those who plan on taking advantage of the opportunity to seek long-term employment in Japan. I hope that when and if this privilege is issued to us, we will respect and honor the trust that will be given to us.

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